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Friday, 15 March 2013

It is one of those situations in which the preposterousness of the suggestion takes your breath away, even as you find yourself mildly surprised that what is being proposed hasn’t already happened.

On the one hand, there’s the sheer unlikeliness of the idea that the serene corridors of Buckingham Palace with their slightly fusty elegance will one day be filled with paintings supported on balls of elephant dung or life-size images of children with penises projecting from their foreheads.

On the other, you can’t help feeling that in an era when everyone is supposedly “into art”, the Royal family must surely have a quasi-official collection of contemporary art stashed away somewhere – even if they’re unaware they’ve got it.

The suggestion by Tessa Murdoch, curator of a new exhibition of Tudor and Stuart court art at the Victoria & Albert Museum, that the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge should be buying cutting-edge modern art – to “engage with the contemporary” and encourage the wealth of young artistic talent that exists in this country – is being treated as though it is something outrageously novel. Yet isn’t it in some ways almost wearyingly predictable?

Public interest in art has expanded massively over the past two decades, which can only be a good thing. The David and Victoria Beckhams of this world like to think of themselves as mavens of contemporary art, which is probably also in the wider scheme of things not an entirely bad thing. More than that, there seems to be barely a public-funded project in this country that doesn’t attempt to “add value” through art – the Olympics being only the most visible recent example of this. Private views of “difficult” contemporary art, which 30 years ago would have been attended only by a scruffy huddle of the cognoscenti, now rival film premieres and society parties in terms of paparazzi-pulling power.

And if the Royal family were to embroil themselves in the rackety super-bling of the contemporary art scene, it certainly wouldn’t be setting a precedent. The royals of the past didn’t buy great works of art just because they liked them – though some undoubtedly did – but because art was an inescapable aspect of grandeur. Now, art is an inescapable aspect of cool. And cool is arguably of considerably more value to the Royal family than grandeur.

The House of Windsor has done an extraordinary job of maintaining a dignified distance (in the face of hugely publicised setbacks) while hanging in with increasingly informal times. Say what you like about William and Kate, they are refreshingly unstuffy in comparison with their forebears. Aligning themselves with contemporary art – the new rock’n’roll, as it’s been referred to for nearly two decades – feels an astute piece of brand management. Indeed, given their age and the fact that Kate has a degree in art history, it would seem rather odd if it didn’t happen purely of its own accord.

Yet if William and Kate do get involved in buying contemporary art, it certainly won’t be under the aegis of that magnificent institution the Royal Art Collection – that great hoard of painting, sculpture and objets d’art amassed by William’s ancestors which ranks as one of the world’s great collections.

While it’s tempting to imagine the members of the Royal family going out with the royal cheque book to make acquisitions that will stamp their taste on the collection, they don’t own it. The Royal Collection is held in trust for the nation and administered by a charitable trust. Acquisitions, such as they are these days, are made by the trustees, the latest being a suite of Warhol prints of, unsurprisingly, the Queen.

While Tessa Murdoch talks of the Duke and Duchess encouraging great portraiture, royals have little say in the commissioning of official portraits. If they wish to become contemporary art collectors, the Cambridges will have to spend their own money on their own entirely private collection to be housed in their own apartments. The last royal to do this on any scale was the Queen Mother, who bought mid-20th-century Neo-Romantic painters such as Graham Sutherland and John Piper – then at the cutting edge of British art – on the advice of Kenneth Clark, the hugely influential director of the National Gallery.

But what would William and Kate buy that would immediately identify them with the taste of their time, and which current art grandee would advise them? Charles Saatchi? The YBA generation – Hirst, Emin et al – whom Saatchi helped to fame may be associated with youthful bravado, but they are old enough to be the Cambridges’ parents and well past their sell-by date from an artistic point of view.

The fact is that there is nothing in contemporary art that screams now the way Warhol and Lichtenstein did in the Sixties, or Hirst and Emin arguably did in the Nineties. The young artists of today are a rather well-mannered, studious bunch comfortably absorbed in refining and tweaking the developments of previous decades in an art world where the barriers have long been comfortably set.

A cynic such as, well, Hilary Mantel might say that made them and the Cambridges well-suited to each other. Indeed, royal patronage might seem the last nail in the coffin for modern art as a subversive, anti-establishment force. Yet in all honesty, that old chestnut really bit the dust long before William and Kate were even born.

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Tuesday, 12 March 2013

The Books That Shaped Art History: review

Posted by m adeel | 03:13 Categories: , , ,

‘O Lord, how bored I am with it!’ cried Roger Fry as he pored over the draft of his book on Cézanne. ‘It seems to me poor formless stuff and I should like to begin it all over again’. Good on Virginia Woolf for including this episode in her biography of the art historian. Scholars spend so much time analysing the great critics’ works that they easily forget the doubts which bred them, as The Books That Shaped Art History shows.

Art historians find it difficult to dodge the lofty lineage of earlier scholarship. As a case in point, here I find myself reviewing a book of 16 reviews of books which shaped art history in the 20th century. Among the 16 art historian authors of Shone and Stonard’s volume are the professors who imparted to me the knowledge they took from the movers and shakers of 20th-criticism, the Gombrich and Greenberg to Alpers and Krauss of this book’s subtitle.

The Books That Shaped Art History hammers home that point with subtle force: Art History is little else than received wisdom. It’s as much about theorizing and re-theorising other theorists’ theories about art, these days, as it is about looking at pictures.

It wasn’t always this way. As Paul Hills says in this volume of Michael Baxandall’s book, Painting and Experience in Fifteenth Century Italy (1972), ‘Unlike the practice that has become dominant in subsequent decades, there is no proliferation of footnotes, no scholarly namedropping, no parading of scholarly allegiances’.

The books of Roger Fry, Bernard Berenson, Kenneth Clark, E.H. Gombrich, and all the other famous art historians discussed in this collection of essays certainly shaped Art History today, but one can’t help thinking that in doing so they might also have zapped it of its own voice.

In a point Courtauld Professor Susie Nash puts particularly well in her essay on German scholar Erwin Panofsky, for 20th-century criticism to be great it didn’t always have to be right.

Many of his arguments were ill-conceived, some of them glaringly so, since he was frequently hindered from accessing primary material. But it was Panofsky’s vibrant, big-guns approach to his discipline that makes his work so engaging, and therefore so enduringly important. Above all, what continues to make Panofsky’s ‘big Flemish book’, Early Netherlandish Painting (1953) such a fun read is the unexpectedness of the allusions; Hans Memling, perhaps best known for his exquisite altarpieces, is compared to Mendelssohn and characterised as ‘the very model of a major minor master’, a formula as Nash notes he borrowed from Gilbert and Sullivan’s Pirates of Penzance.

Panofsky was equally unabashed (one feels he did so consciously) about allowing contemporary politics to infiltrate his descriptions of art. So Flanders and Italy were dubbed the ‘Great Powers’ of European painting. All of which appeals as much to the browsing reader today as it did to the post-War American audience that first experienced Panofsky’s book as a series of lectures at Harvard.

In general, in fact, the art historians who have found a worthy place in Shone and Stonard’s volume were all ambitious risk takers. Take Nikolaus Pevsner, the great architectural historian. The aim of his Pioneers…(1936), as Colin Amery explains in his excellent essay, was to show that the Modern Movement, ‘the genuine and adequate style of our century, was achieved by 1914’ and sprung from William Morris and the Arts and Crafts Movement, Art Nouveau, and Victorian engineering. Few today would couch a hypothesis in such staunch terms, but it is partly this confident approach that marks Pevsner’s book out as influential.

The Books That Shaped Art History is a thought-provoking reflection on a century of brilliant Art Historical scholarship. To the Art Historian it offers still more. Praising the masters while accepting and assessing their errors, this volume sets the bar for the next generation. It heralds a bold approach.

The Books That Shaped Art History, Richard Shone and John-Paul Stonard (editors). Thames & Hudson. £24.95.

Daisy Dunn is a trustee of the Joint Association of Classical Teachers, which promotes the study of Greek and Latin in schools across the UK. She writes widely about the Renaissance and the ancient world.

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Monday, 11 March 2013

Tony Hall: my plans for the BBC

Posted by m adeel | 19:30 Categories:

He politely reminds me that the BBC is strictly off the agenda today. “It’s not me being difficult, but I’m not there yet. I want to listen to people, to understand what’s going on, understand some of the issues.”

There is a chink of a concession later when I ask what, in three words, should the BBC stand for? “I said I’m not going to do that. But I think the BBC should be distinctive, it should deliver exciting programmes that you won’t get anywhere else, and it should be your friend. I think so many people have real passion for the BBC, they really do. People say: 'I couldn’t live without Radio 4, Radio 3, BBC One, EastEnders…’ What I’ve learnt here is that the connection between audiences and their passions, and you and artists at an organisation, is really precious and you’ve got to work at it.”

Although he doesn’t start the job until next month, Hall has been making changes ahead of schedule. Helen Boaden, the BBC’s former head of news, heavily criticised for her failure to get to grips with the spiralling Savile crisis, has been moved to radio, while James Purnell, the former Labour culture secretary, was recently appointed director of strategy and digital. Anne Bulford, Hall’s former finance director at Covent Garden, will join him as the BBC’s managing director.

Sir David Attenborough has also been in for a chat about his visions for the future – and it appears his visions are 3D, a medium Attenborough has experimented with.

“David is excited about 3D and what they are doing with natural history on Sky,” says Hall. “We got excited about it, too, and we’ll see where it goes.”

Last week, Sir Nicholas Hytner, the artistic director of the National Theatre, attacked the BBC for chasing a “Downton ratings mentality” at the cost of quality arts programming. The corporation also faced criticism for sidelining The Review Show from BBC Two to BBC Four. Why, asked Sir Nicholas, can’t the BBC form a “close relationship” with companies such as his own, the Royal Ballet and Opera North, for instance, and broadcast more of the live arts? As he put it: “It’s low-hanging fruit for the taking.”

Hall won’t be drawn on programming ideas, but would like to see more of the arts. “Television and radio have a very important role in pointing you to things you otherwise wouldn’t necessarily come to, and for opera and ballet, too, that’s important.

“You need someone like the BBC to say, hey, look, this is what’s going on. And I can quite see, some time over the next decade, being able to choose to pay on your TV, or your mobile device, to watch what goes on at the stage here or the National Theatre, or at the British Museum.”

He champions Maestro, the BBC Two series where celebrities competed to conduct Covent Garden’s orchestra. “I’m absolutely all for it – let’s make this as accessible as you can to people.” But he was less enthused by ITV’s Popstar to Operastar, where judges, including the rock singer Meat Loaf, gave tips to failed pop stars attempting to sing opera. “I did see it,” says Hall. “It was, er, a very brave thing. But people are attracted by quality and do not like being talked down to.”

Hall is returning to where he started his career. The son of a bank manager, he joined the BBC as a graduate trainee in 1973, straight from Oxford. Rising through the ranks, he was senior producer of the Six O’Clock News aged 33, then assistant editor of Nine O’Clock News, before becoming chief executive of news and current affairs in 1996. He left for Covent Garden in 1998 after losing out to Greg Dyke for the top job.

The BBC he returns to is a troubled beast, but Hall is adept at steadying the ship. When he joined the Royal Opera House in 2001, Covent Garden was a mess, having parted company with five chief executives in as many years. But he has restored artistic and financial credibility and reels off his some of his proudest achievements.

“We’re playing to over 92 per cent full houses and selling out many nights, 40 per cent of our audiences are under 45, last year 47,000 people watched our Romeo and Juliet at the O2 in seats from £10 to £20, 100,000 people across the country watched Richard Eyre’s La Traviata on big screens and in cinemas.”

He cites Anna Nicole – the controversial Mark-Anthony Turnage opera about the late Anna Nicole Smith, the troubled Playboy model – and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, the groundbreaking ballet based on Lewis Carroll’s books – as highlights. Both were risky propositions for Covent Garden’s main stage, both were sell-outs.

What are the most important lessons he will take to New Broadcasting House? “Put the art first,” he says. “Ambition is important. You can’t be cynical with your audiences. You’ve got to take risks, but not risks at any cost – risks that are thought through.

“Secondly, give as many people you can things of really high quality. Thirdly, teams. I’m a profound believer in teams. Getting teams to perform well, to acknowledge when things aren’t working out, to celebrate when they are, to work together collaboratively – that really matters to me hugely.

“And getting the money right. Wherever you can, save.”

Hall can take his own advice and readily admits to things that haven’t worked at Covent Garden, including 3D cinema screenings of Carmen and Opera Shots, a series of experimental half-hour operas by avant-garde composers, whose subjects ranged from football hooliganism to a woman taking a pregnancy test. The productions left much of the audiences bemused and the box office underwhelmed.

“You’ve to give artists the chance to say different things to audiences in new ways. It’s important for organisations to keep trying new things, and not everything will work. You’ve got to have that attitude. We tried 3D, we’re now rethinking where we are with that. Was it worth doing? Of course. You’ve got to keep pushing, haven’t you?”

Hall is unhappy that the arts can be seen as a “luxury good”. “I find it so frustrating when ministers get beaten up for coming to watch opera. The arts should not be seen as at the margins, as part of 'luvviedom’. The arts are central to our lives and who we are.”

But while Hall recently welcomed George Osborne, Michael Gove and Ed Vaizey to Wagner’s 'Ring’ Cycle, he warns the Government to steer clear of policies that appear to sideline the arts in the national curriculum, such as the English Baccalaureate, which the Education Secretary was forced to reconsider.

“I hope the rethink enables us to get the arts broadly into the curriculum, because it does so much,” says Hall. “It should be protected – it’s vital to our future, it’s vital to arts-going audiences, but it’s also vital to young people’s sense of who they are and their self-esteem.”

He bats away the idea that opera and ballet are the reserve of a black-tie brigade. “I don’t think the old adage that these are elite art forms is right. I’m enormously confident about the future of opera and ballet in terms of wooing and winning new audiences.”

But when some tickets cost in excess of £800, fans continue to complain of being priced out of the market. “We’re conscious that price is a problem. Which is why it’s important to keep half the house at £50 or less, and why we’ve lowered prices on some things this season, such as Tosca. If I could wave a wand and lower prices for some pieces by even more, I’d love to. But we’ve had to cope with a diminishing subsidy. Life is a damn sight harder now.”

As Covent Garden’s chief executive, he has spent 12 years out and about “four or five nights a week, and sometimes weekends”, and as director-general it seems unlikely that his wife Cynthia, headmistress of Wycombe Abbey girls school, will be seeing more of him any time soon. What else can you say to the man whose predecessor lasted 54 days in the job, other than best of luck with it all? “I’ll need it,” he says.


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The title of this exhibition is deceptive – what if we’ve already seen the Royal Palaces, and the Holbeins and Van Dycks on display year round? The subtitle, ‘Tudors, Stuarts, and the Russian Tsars,’ is baffling and vague. The trouble is that the real theme of the show is: the ceremony of diplomatic gift giving during the first century of trade between our two nations. A prospect as inviting as the Arctic seas that provided passage for the courtship.

In fact, though obscure and scholarly, the show is revelatory, not only illuminating a neglected slice of material and political history – but also bringing a rare and important example of British Renaissance art to our shores.

The most common gift sent by the Courts of England to Moscow was expensive silverware, nearly all of which was melted down in this country during the English Civil War. Luckily, every time a piece of silver was shipped to Moscow, it was carefully weighed and inscribed in Slavonic letters with their weight and the source of the gift: an effective way of knowing at a glance which house was in good favour. The gifts have been preserved in the Kremlin Armory Museum and this is the first time the entire collection has been spotlighted like this over here.

Before we reach the silver, the V&A curators have laid an excellent red carpet of four rooms setting the scene, and showing how Henry VIII’s extravagant eye and taste for heraldry would shape the identity of the succeeding Stuart courts (who would woo the Tsars proper), and how they liked to be represented abroad. This extended to jewellery, armour, coats of arms, sculpted beasts, and paintings.

The largest space is painted a deep regal red and is, thankfully, low-lit. In the centre of the room is the tiered “buffet” of Sixteenth and early Seventeenth century British silver, as the Tsar himself would have displayed them. It’s a blinding show of riches so extraordinarily lavish that it feels almost embarrassing to look. Shape was generally considered more important than ornament in Renaissance silver, and as a collection they have an impressive, almost muscular sculptural presence: the cups are gourd shaped and font shaped, and there’s a Leopard ewer bearing his ribs and showing his teeth.

The faces on the walls that look in on the silver, including a wonderful recently discovered portrait of Elizabeth I, reveal how complex the politics was and how many personalities were involved in the relationship-building process. Among them is merchant Thomas Smith, James I’s special ambassador the Tsar, who was in charge of gifting him a lavish chariot from the King, and there’s an excellent three minute film about the significance of this act.

All in all, it was an expensive custom, but perhaps cheaper than war – and one likes to think not money wasted. We still enjoy the fruits of the courtship today. Anyone, for instance, who has seen the pelicans in St James Park may not know that they are the direct descendants of a 1622 gift from the Russian ambassador to Charles II.

Until July 14. Free entry; vam.ac.uk


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Van Dyck masterpiece discovered

Posted by m adeel | 02:06 Categories: ,

The story of how the masterpiece, which languished in a storeroom at the Bowes Museum at Barnard Castle, County Durham, will be told on the BBC2 Culture Show at 6.30 pm tonight.

It is one of 210,000 artworks which have been photographed and put online as part of the Public Catalogue.

The 72.4 x 61 cm oval oil painting aroused the interest of Bendor Grosvenor who suspected there could be more to the picture than first thought.

What followed was a prolonged exercise in detective work in which the painting was taken on an Odyssey by Alastair Sooke, the presenter and Telegraph art critic.

First the paint itself was analysed to establish the work was created in the 1630s.

At the same time the archive at the National Gallery was used to verify the sitter was Olivia Boteler Porter, a lady in waiting to Henrietta Maria, the wife of Charles 1.

Then the thick layer of varnish and grime was removed which enabled the picture to verified as a Van Dyck Christopher Brown, Director of the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology.

“To find a portrait by Van Dyck is rare enough, but to find one of his 'friendship' portraits like this, of the wife of his best friend in England, is extraordinarily lucky,” Dr Grosvenor said.

“Although as part of our national heritage values are irrelevant, for insurance purposes it should now be valued at anything up to £1 million.

“Had it appeared at auction as a copy, and in its dirty state, it would probably only have been estimated at about £3-5,000.”


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Sunday, 10 March 2013

Delta at LAX - tell me something I didn't know - Airline Business FlightGlobal.com  Privacy & Cookies  Privacy & Cookies HomeNewsMy FGResearchAircraftJobsAirSpaceImagesCutaways Historic Air shows >">More >> Airline Business - Airline Business Archives Select a Month... February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 May 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 January 2011 December 2010 November 2010 October 2010 September 2010 August 2010 July 2010 June 2010 May 2010 April 2010 March 2010 February 2010 January 2010 December 2009 November 2009 October 2009 September 2009 August 2009 July 2009 June 2009 May 2009 April 2009 March 2009 February 2009 January 2009 December 2008 November 2008 October 2008 September 2008 August 2008 July 2008 June 2008 May 2008 April 2008 March 2008 February 2008 January 2008 December 2007 November 2007 October 2007 September 2007 August 2007 July 2007 June 2007 May 2007 April 2007 March 2007 February 2007 January 2007 December 2006 November 2006 October 2006 September 2006 August 2006 July 2006 June 2006 May 2006 April 2006 March 2006 February 2006 January 2006 December 2005 November 2005 October 2005 September 2005 August 2005 July 2005 Search Recent Comments Henk commented on Spain 1 Chile 0 (after extra time): Surely it freddie beck commented on Who remembered BA had a stake in Air Mauritius?: Excellent Droitwich commented on Air New Zealand on weed: the biofuel sort: Guys if yo J.Healy commented on PICTURE: The new United Airlines livery revealed: Ugly. Con Darth Rex commented on Don't fancy yours much...: Beauty is Bob commented on PICTURE: The new United Airlines livery revealed: When you'r Tracy commented on PICTURE: The new United Airlines livery revealed: The older Maarten commented on PICTURE: The new United Airlines livery revealed: Hmmm, look Matt commented on Don't fancy yours much...: From which Victoria Moores commented on Virgin unveils its new colours: Hi Caio,T Recent Entries Virgin pair and Baltic Miles take the plaudits at 2013 Loyalty Awards Kingdom's prince gives up Airbus's queen Does AA-US Airways deal signal final piece of US merger jigsaw? What was Steve Ridgway's biggest Virgin regret? Case of the missing American tail American steps up game with new interior Customer service the Ryanair way What next for Italian airlines? American's new livery - in good company? Can Frontier succeed in Trenton? Flightglobal Blogroll FlightbloggerThe DEW LineLearmountImage of the Day blogUnusual AttitudeHyperbolaAs the Cro(ft) FliesThe Flight BlogAsian SkiesWings Down UnderThe Flight International BlogRunway GirlEditor's blog Subscribe by E-mail Delta at LAX - tell me something I didn't know

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Edward Russell on March 8, 2013 3:28 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBacks (0) | So Delta Air Lines is expanding at Los Angeles. What else is new?

The Atlanta-based SkyTeam alliance member has been dribbling out the expansion since December when it loaded flights between Los Angeles and Seattle (from 8 April). Flights to Nashville (from 8 April) were added in January, Anchorage (from 21 June), Bozeman (from 22 June), San Jose, California (from 1 July) and Spokane (from 10 June) in February. It will also begin flights to San Jose, Costa Rica, from 1 July.

Delta will boost frequency to Guadalajara, New Orleans, Oakland, Phoenix, Puerto Vallarta, Sacramento and San Francisco as well, it says.

DL_LAX.jpg

Flickr user InSapphoWeTrust

Stephen Hedden, team leader for network planning at Delta who focuses on the US west coast, said that the airline is taking advantage of "opportune flying" on aircraft that have down time at either Los Angeles or outstations with its new flights, on the sidelines of the Network USA 2013 forum in San Antonio on 4 March.

Delta is testing markets to see where best to allocate its aircraft out west beyond its third quarter schedule, he added.

Even with the expansion, Delta will still be third fiddle to United Airlines and American Airlines in terms of available seat kilometres (ASKs) out of Los Angeles in July, according to Innovata FlightMap Analytics. United will have a 14.1% market share with 1.9 million ASKs, American a 12.7% share with 1.7 million ASKs and Delta a 10.3% share with nearly 1.4 million ASKs.

While it may be third, Delta benefits from a large network of partner airlines at the airport. Its strategic partners Alaska Airlines, Air France-KLM and Virgin Australia, and codeshare partners Aeromexico, China Airlines, China Eastern, China Southern, Hawaiian Airlines, Korean Air and WestJet all serve Los Angeles.

It will be interesting to watch what routes Delta sticks with and what it does not as it tests out markets Los Angeles, especially as the competitive landscape changes with the American-US Airways merger.

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By
Edward Russell on March 8, 2013 3:28 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBacks (0) | So Delta Air Lines is expanding at Los Angeles. What else is new?

The Atlanta-based SkyTeam alliance member has been dribbling out the expansion since December when it loaded flights between Los Angeles and Seattle (from 8 April). Flights to Nashville (from 8 April) were added in January, Anchorage (from 21 June), Bozeman (from 22 June), San Jose, California (from 1 July) and Spokane (from 10 June) in February. It will also begin flights to San Jose, Costa Rica, from 1 July.

Delta will boost frequency to Guadalajara, New Orleans, Oakland, Phoenix, Puerto Vallarta, Sacramento and San Francisco as well, it says.

DL_LAX.jpg

Flickr user InSapphoWeTrust

Stephen Hedden, team leader for network planning at Delta who focuses on the US west coast, said that the airline is taking advantage of "opportune flying" on aircraft that have down time at either Los Angeles or outstations with its new flights, on the sidelines of the Network USA 2013 forum in San Antonio on 4 March.

Delta is testing markets to see where best to allocate its aircraft out west beyond its third quarter schedule, he added.

Even with the expansion, Delta will still be third fiddle to United Airlines and American Airlines in terms of available seat kilometres (ASKs) out of Los Angeles in July, according to Innovata FlightMap Analytics. United will have a 14.1% market share with 1.9 million ASKs, American a 12.7% share with 1.7 million ASKs and Delta a 10.3% share with nearly 1.4 million ASKs.

While it may be third, Delta benefits from a large network of partner airlines at the airport. Its strategic partners Alaska Airlines, Air France-KLM and Virgin Australia, and codeshare partners Aeromexico, China Airlines, China Eastern, China Southern, Hawaiian Airlines, Korean Air and WestJet all serve Los Angeles.

It will be interesting to watch what routes Delta sticks with and what it does not as it tests out markets Los Angeles, especially as the competitive landscape changes with the American-US Airways merger.

Categories: Airlines, airports, Americas Tags: delta air lines, lax, los angeles 0 TrackBacks

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Categories A380 (28) AB Travel Diary (15) Add category (2) Airframer competition (5) India (6) World issues (25) Africa/Middle East (80) Airlines (343) Americas (349) Asia-Pacific (97) Best of the Blogs (34) Book Review (1) Environment (1) Europe (458) India (2) Low Cost Carriers (33) Personalities (36) Quirkies (55) WLCAC 09 (9) airports (13) biofuels (2) Recent Assets DL_LAX.jpg loyalty jpg.jpg Loyalty winners.jpg A380 kingdom.png A380customers.jpg AA new tail Screen shot 2013-02-04 at 3.27.12 PM.png AA_773_Cabin_WEB.jpg AA_1st_desk_WEB.jpg AA Biz class privacy Subscribe to feed Subscribe to this blog's feed Sign up toFlight Digital MagazineFlight Print MagazineAirline Business MagazineE-newslettersRSSEvents DisclaimerTerms & ConditionsPrivacy PolicySubscriptionsFlight NewsletterAbout UsMedia CentreContact usSite MapRBI media jobs UK© Reed Business Information 2011

View the original article here

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